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News - 2008

Biomedical researchers create artificial human bone marrow
Huliq News, Dec. 23, 2008
UTMB’s Dr. Joan Nichols is mentioned in this article about artificial bone marrow that can continuously make red and white blood cells being created in a laboratory. Versions of this article were published worldwide on numerous Web sites.


UTMB briefs
Houston Chronicle, Dec. 16, 2008
In this weekly column in the Clear Lake/Bay Area section, news items about UTMB include the formal dedication of the Galveston National Laboratory, four new faculty members in the School of Nursing and UTMB is a finalist for the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service by the Association of American Medical Colleges.


City water tests negative for Legionella bacteria
Galveston County Daily News, Dec. 10, 2008
Galveston’s water supply does not have Legionella bacteria. The city ordered tests last week after UTMB announced it had found traces of the bacteria in the water at John Sealy Hospital. Several other news outlets ran versions of the article, including Ch. 13, KTRK-TV in Houston.


‘No reason to panic’ about bacteria in water
Galveston County Daily News, Dec. 6, 2008
A small amount of legionella bacteria has been found in John Sealy Hospital’s water supply. According to UTMB’s Karen Sexton , "There is no reason to panic. We do not believe our patients are at risk." Numerous news outlets, including the Houston Chronicle, several Houston television stations and The Associated Press had their own versions of this report. Drs. C. Glen Mayhall and Joan Richardson also were featured in several of those reports.


Galveston biodefense lab was fortress during Ike
Dallas Morning News, Nov. 16, 2008
This article surveys the safety and security measures of the Galveston National Laboratory at UTMB. Reporter Emily Ramshaw wrote, "The nation’s newest mammoth biodefense lab towers like a fortress over this hurricane-battered ghost town, a rare unscathed sight among uprooted palm trees, shattered shop windows and beach homes teetering perilously on warped stilts."


Letters: State of UTMB and Texas
The Houston Chronicle, Nov. 14, 2008
Several readers wrote letters to the editor to criticize the UT System Board of Regents and state leaders for not taking action to avoid the layoffs at UTMB.


UTMB will retain its academic standing
The Houston Chronicle, Nov. 14, 2008
UTMB Drs. David Callender and Steven Lieberman are quoted in this article about how the institution will retain its accreditation for its schools by sending students and residents to other facilities for clinical experience. Callender said that UTMB will have a more difficult time fulfilling its role of caring for island patients who lack health insurance.



Regents authorize layoffs at UTMB
Numerous news outlets reported on the decision by the University of Texas System Board of Regents to order the layoffs of 3,800 UTMB employees as a result of the damage caused to UTMB by Hurricane Ike. The Galveston County Daily News has numerous articles about the layoffs at


The Galveston National Laboratory was officially dedicated Tuesday
The Galveston National Laboratory was officially dedicated Tuesday, and several news outlets covered the event. From the Galveston County Daily News: "Almost 1,000 medical branch employees, elected officials and even one Hollywood celebrity — actress Morgan Fairchild — attended the dedication of the Galveston National Lab, where researchers will study both naturally occurring diseases and microbes that might be altered and used by terrorists. … The $174 million laboratory where researchers will develop drugs and vaccines to battle infectious diseases will forever change the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston and possibly the lives of millions of people around the world." The article quotes Drs. David Callender and Stan Lemon, as well as U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison and interim UT chancellor Dr. Ken Shine.

View the video report that appeared on KPRC-TV (Ch. 2, Houston).
Another version of the story was published in The Daily Texan.


A new world of disease research
Galveston County Daily News, Nov. 12, 2008
Dr. James LeDuc, deputy director of the Galveston National Laboratory, writes in this guest column how he is eager to start using the lab to meet the "challenges posed to our nation by emerging infectious diseases and the threat of bioterrorism… This effort will create the foundation for the development of new vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests that we hope will significantly contribute to the formation of a dynamic and vibrant biotech industry in Galveston and in the greater Houston area."


Island’s new national laboratory will make the world a safer place
Galveston County Daily News, Nov. 11, 2008
Dr. Stan Lemon writes about the Galveston National Laboratory in this guest column. "Just as it will brighten the future of infectious disease research, the laboratory will contribute to a brighter future for Galveston. … It’s a tribute to the community and university that such a wonderful facility as the Galveston National Lab can hold its grand opening in the shadow of one of the greatest disasters to befall this beautiful island."


National lab a ‘bright spot’ for UTMB
Galveston County Daily News, Nov. 11, 2008
Dr. Stan Lemon, director of the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, is quoted in this article anticipating the opening of the GNL. "It will serve to reinforce the strength of the biomedical research in the Galveston and Houston community — and we are really one community."


DNA testing of the Romanovs
Medical News Today, Nov. 8, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on the use of DNA science to resolve the mystery of what happened to the last Russian tsar, Nicholas. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 91 radio stations.


Isle biohazard lab built to stand
Houston Chronicle, Nov. 9, 2008
UTMB will dedicate the $176 million Galveston National Laboratory tomorrow. This report covers safety measures as well as the economic impact the lab is expected to have on the state’s economy. James LeDuc, the lab’s associate director, is quoted.


UTMB a vital part of island
Galveston County Daily News, Nov. 10, 2008
In a guest column, former Galveston resident Anne Wegner urges support for UTMB, pointing out the many benefits the institution brings to the community as an employer, health care provider, educator and research center.


UT regents to hold teleconference about UTMB
Galveston County Daily News, Nov. 6, 2008
This article states that the UT System Board of Regents will meet in a special private teleconference today to discuss personnel and legal issues related to hurricane recovery at UTMB. Most of the discussions were scheduled to take place in private and no public announcement was expected. The regents have a regularly scheduled meeting next week in El Paso.


Studying dangerous diseases in Galveston to keep us safe
KHOU-TV (Ch. 11, Houston), Nov. 5, 2008
UTMB’s James LeDuc and Joan Nichols are featured in this report about the Galveston National Laboratory that the reporter notes did not sustain any damage from Hurricane Ike. "We’ll be working on the development of vaccines, diagnostic tests and drugs to recognize the disease to prevent the illnesses they cause and to respond to them accordingly," LeDuc says. Nichols explains how UTMB researchers prepare when a hurricane threatens the Gulf of Mexico, "We start slowing down, cleaning up and putting things away."


Took a peek inside the island's big new biolab
Houston Chronicle, Nov. 3, 2008
Eric Berger, the Houston Chronicle’s "SciGuy," toured the Galveston National Laboratory in advance of the dedication scheduled for Nov. 11. "First off, let me say that if I'm ever stuck on Galveston Island during a hurricane, I'd probably want to be inside this facility," he said. "Yes, it seems daft to build a nearly $200 million facility with the world's deadliest biologicals in hurricane country. But the reality strikes me quite differently. In fact, there's an advantage that comes from being able to know a couple days in advance of a hurricane's threat. This offers time to lock down the lab, which simply wouldn't be possible in an area threatened by tornadoes or earthquakes."


Callender briefs employees on UTMB's future
Galveston County Daily News, Oct. 29, 2008
This article is about the meeting that Dr. David L. Callender held to speak with employees about the future of UTMB. Callender told about 600 people in Levin Hall that no decision had been made about UTMB and noted that that many other people are involved in deciding what UTMB’s configuration will be.


State leaders: UTMB layoffs not imminent
KPRC-TV (Ch. 2, Houston), Oct. 28, 2008
Several top legislative leaders, led by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, toured UTMB to view the damage caused by Hurricane Ike. At the end of the tour, the state officials said that layoffs at UTMB were not imminent. From the article: "The Nov. 14 deadline that many employees fear will end their careers at the state’s oldest medical school is artificial in terms of legislative leaders’ efforts to come up with a plan for the school’s future, Dewhurst said… Whatever is decided will be best for the people of Galveston, medical branch employees and the people of Texas, he said." The article states that, if layoffs are necessary, legislators will make sure employees have sufficient notice to seek employment elsewhere.


Future of UTMB remains unknown
KPRC-TV (Ch. 2, Houston), Oct. 28, 2008
This report is about the future of UTMB and begins by showing UTMB employees Wendy Baker and Robert English who have turned their home into a day care because UTMB’s day care center has not reopened. "When you are sitting there worrying about where your child is and if they are safe, it's hard to be productive," English said. The report also features state officials, including Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, who toured UTMB. Dewhurst said that many options need to be considered, including whether some functions of UTMB should be moved off the island. Dr. David Callender, in discussing many options being considered, says, "People are concerned. They’ve heard, ‘You’re only going to be a community hospital.’ That’s not true. We’re UTMB."


Galveston National Laboratory set for Nov. 11 dedication
Houston Business Journal, Oct. 29, 2008
UTMB’s Dr. Stanley Lemon is quoted in this article about the formal dedication next month of the Galveston National Laboratory. "The GNL brings the focus on global health research to Galveston — and that’s something our local community can be proud of. This facility is indeed a national resource." A similar version of the same article is in the Galveston County Daily News.


Galveston biolab stands up to Hurricane Ike
Boston University Today, Oct. 29, 2008
UTMB’s Joan Nichols is quoted in this article that states that the Galveston National Laboratory sustained no damage from Hurricane Ike and also describes the phased-shutdown procedures that UTMB follows when the Texas coast might be threatened by a hurricane. "We had enough time, and had planned so well, that those last two days were not panicked. They were about consolidating our animals as much as possible, getting the university itself ready with its facilities plan to fall back to essential areas that would have emergency power and emergency chilling through the storm. All of this was taken care of well before landfall. So the Friday before the storm was actually kind of quiet," Nichols said. Alisha Prather, communications director for the lab, also is quoted: "You hate to have to be tested like this, but we passed. We were able to test the new building in a hands-on experience. There was no active research and no agents in the building at the time, and so you’re left with the ability to truly test your mechanics. And it went really well."


Bio lab in Galveston raises concerns
The New York Times, Oct. 28, 2008
UTMB’s Dr. James LeDuc is quoted in this article about the Galveston National Laboratory, a structure not yet operational that did not sustain any damage from Hurricane Ike. While the article quotes some people who still question locating the facility on a barrier island, the article also states that the lab is located here because UTMB has some of the best virologists in the country. And LeDuc notes just how strong the lab is: "The entire island can wash away and this is still going to be here. With Hurricane Ike, we had no damage. The only evidence the hurricane occurred was water that was blown under one of the doors and a puddle in the lobby."


Biosafety lab passes disaster test
Nature, Oct. 22, 2008
The current issue of this national journal commends UTMB’s new research complex and the staff that secured it: "On 11 November, U.S. officials will dedicate a new research complex containing high-containment labs for deadly pathogens: the $175 million Galveston National Laboratory in Texas. Yet even as questions arise over the safety of other biosecurity research facilities, the cornerstone of the new complex survived its biggest test yet: Hurricane Ike, which devastated Galveston Island last month, left the new biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) lab intact. … [A] sterling effort meant that staff moved dozens of freezers of samples to safety. No infectious agents were released, almost all frozen specimens were saved and highly sensitive colonies of exotic animals were unharmed." The article quotes UTMB Drs. C.J. Peters, Stan Lemon and Scott Weaver.


UTMB news briefs
The Houston Chronicle, Oct. 21, 2008
This marks the post-Ike return of UTMB news briefs to the Bay Area News section of the Houston Chronicle. This week’s news items: Elizabeth Protas is named dean of the School of Allied Health Sciences; Dr. Allan Brasier is appointed director of the new Institute for Translational Sciences; the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, awarded a five-year, $10.9 million contract to establish the Clinical Proteomics Center for Infectious Diseases and Biodefense; all 86 medical units of the state prison system are fully operational, including a Texas City clinic damaged by Hurricane Ike; and Lisa Cain, an associate professor in the neuroscience and cell biology department, is selected as a fellow of the African Scientific Institute.


Classes resume at UTMB
Galveston County Daily News, Oct. 21, 2008
More than 1,000 students returned to classes at UTMB and were welcomed back by Dr. Garland Anderson, UTMB provost and dean of medicine.


Officials uncertain of medical site’s future
Brazosport Facts, Oct. 20, 2008
This article is about Brazoria County, which has a contract with UTMB to treat indigent patients. UTMB has been using telemedicine to see some of the patients but Brazoria County is anxious for UTMB to be fully functional. Jim Wiginton, who oversees indigent care in Brazoria County, said, "I think it’s fair to say the county is eager to renew the agreement with UTMB." And Tonya Visor, a spokeswoman for the Angleton Danbury Medical Center, which has an agreement with UTMB to provide indigent care for people who live in Angleton, Danbury and Rosharon, said that, if UTMB was to cut back services greatly, it would be a major loss to the county and not just to the indigent. She said that many people travel to the medical branch to see specialists who are not available locally.


UTMB students return to class weeks after Ike
KTRK-TV, Ch. 13, ABC-Houston
Greg Asimakis, UTMB assistant dean of education, and Robert Mulcahy, a medical student, are quoted in this report about students returning to campus in the wake of Hurricane Ike.


Students return to UTMB
Back-to-school for medical, nursing, graduate and health professions students
UTMB Homepage, October 2008
More than a thousand students returned to classes at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston on Monday, Oct. 20, just a month and a week after most fled the island in the wake of Hurricane Ike.

A total of 460 first and second year medical students, 450 biomedical graduate students, as well as nursing and health professions students gathered at UTMB’s Levin Hall at noon where they were welcomed back by Dr. Garland Anderson, UTMB provost and dean of medicine.

"This experience will change you; it will make you stronger," Anderson said.

He also said that despite the visible changes on campus, the spirit of UTMB and the dedication and determination of its people had not changed and continued to be his inspiration.

Students cheered and applauded following an a capella rendition of "You’ll Never Walk Alone" by David Mitchell, program coordinator of the Jesse Tree.


Dedication of the Galveston National Laboratory
UTMB Homepage, October 2008
After more than five years of careful planning, design and construction, the Galveston National Laboratory (GNL) – one of two National Biocontainment Laboratories constructed with funding awarded in October 2003 by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease/National Institutes of Health – is complete and dedication day is set for November 11, 2008! A formal dedication ceremony will be held on the GNL plaza at 11:30 a.m. and a scientific symposium titled Opportunities in Emerging Infectious Diseases and Biodefense for the 21st Century is scheduled for 1:30 – 5 p.m. in Levin Hall. Click here for more information on the day's events.


Layoffs certain at UTMB
Galveston County Daily News, Oct. 16, 2008
This article states that layoffs are inevitable at UTMB in the wake of the damage caused by Hurricane Ike to numerous buildings. "The question, officials say, is exactly when and how many will lose their jobs after Hurricane Ike flooded buildings, including the hospital, and ran up $710 million in expenses at the island campus… In a pivotal gathering of high-ranking state officials Tuesday, Gov. Rick Perry, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, House Appropriations Committee Warren Chisum and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Steve Ogden and other key decision makers met with medical branch and University of Texas System officials to get a handle on what the island institution needs to stay afloat and avoid cutting 4,000 jobs, a third of its work force." The article states that Gov. Perry may convene another similar meeting as early as next week.


Thousands of jobs on the line at UTMB Galveston
KTRK-TV (Ch. 13), Houston, Oct. 16, 2008
Gov. Rick Perry, in this report, says that the state and federal government are working together to chart UTMB’s future. Until then, he says the state will help employees. "Either finding them employment [or] helping them find new employment and we're talking about what is the right period of time to be able to help those UTMB employees that are not going to be able to go back to work anytime soon." Because it’s unclear how much of the hospital will be reopened, Perry advises employees who are being recruited by other institutions: "You need to make a decision that's best for you and your family. Rather than being held in limbo if you have the opportunity to relocate and take a position somewhere else, you should certainly investigate that and move in that direction again if it's in the best interest of those impacted."


High-security research labs not so high security
The New York Times, Oct. 16, 2008
This article by The Associated Press states that intruders could easily break into two U.S. laboratories where researchers handle some of the world's deadliest germs, according to congressional investigators. The AP identified the vulnerable lab locations as Atlanta and San Antonio. The security problems were documented in a report by the Government Accountability Office that described problems in Biosafety Level 4 labs. The article, which is being distributed widely on the Internet, states that three other BSL-4 labs in the U.S., including the CDC’s facility in Atlanta, the Army's lab at Fort Detrick, Md., and UTMB, have " impressive" security.


Stemming the tide: Sacked by Hurricane Ike, UTMB starts to rebuild its life-sci footing
BioRegion News, Oct. 13, 2008
UTMB’s William New discusses the rebuilding of UTMB’s research capabilities. "Our disaster planning really focuses on protecting three repositories – our data repositories, our freezer repositories with our data specimens, and our animals. … It wasn’t perfect, but all in all we lost very few freezers, and we lost very few animals, and the data — I’ve heard no reports on any problems with the data repository. From one perspective, a very successful plan was in place, very successfully oriented. Our plans were oriented more toward a three- to five-day downtime, with people coming back."


Leaders to decide fate of thousands of UTMB employees
Texas Cable News, Oct. 14, 2008
UT System leaders and state leaders are scheduled to meet in Austin inside the governor’s office Tuesday to decide the fate of thousands of UTMB employees. The Galveston hospital says layoffs are necessary. Thousands of medical jobs are at stake. This could be a decisive blow to the island’s economy as residents try to rebuild a month after Hurricane Ike pounded the area. Now leaders must decide how to shore up UTMB.


UTMB awarded $10.9M for new research center
Houston Business Journal, Oct. 11, 2008
This article is about UTMB receiving a five-year, $10.9 million contract from NIH to establish the Clinical Proteomics Center for Infectious Diseases and Biodefense.

Researchers at the center will analyze human blood and other tissue samples from completed or ongoing clinical studies with the aim of discovering proteins that could serve as biomarkers of infectious disease. Identifying new biomarkers that are present in infected people will help researchers understand how microbes cause disease, which could guide development of diagnostics, therapies or vaccines. "We are very excited about this opportunity to build on our extensive proteomics expertise and translate these technologies to better diagnose and manage infectious diseases," said Dr. Allan Brasier, the center’s principal investigator.

The article has been picked up by several news outlets across the country, including the San Francisco Business Times, the Philadelphia Business Journal and the Condé Nast Portfolio.


Critical care: Difficult decisions lie ahead for determining future of UTMB and health care in Galveston
The Houston Chronicle, Oct. 11, 2008
This editorial in the Houston Chronicle, in a discussion about the future about UTMB, says that any suggestion of moving UTMB elsewhere should be squelched and that the state of Texas and the UT Board of Regents should carefully weigh how UTMB will look as it emerges from the storm. Making a case that UTMB should stay in Galveston, the editorial states: "UTMB is critical to Galveston and the Southeast Texas coast. Its $1.4 billion budget and stature as the region's seventh largest employer testify to its economic importance. Its medical, nursing and allied health sciences schools, along with its graduate school of biomedical sciences, serve more than 2,400 students, and it operates one of only two national biocontainment laboratories. Its researchers reported $156 million in research expenditures in 2007." The editorial acknowledges that some people will lose their jobs at UTMB as the institution is reconfigured but also says: "We hope the layoffs and other changes can be crafted in such a way that UTMB emerges healthy, if smaller, and positioned to survive."


Galveston County Daily News Article
The Galveston County Daily News article focuses on Ogden and reports that he was the lawmaker who stopped a plan to lay off 4,000 UTMB employees. "It seems unfair to tell people on pretty short notice that in addition to all the losses they suffered, by the way, you lost your job. The good news in all this is the state of Texas is in pretty good financial shape, so it’s not impossible for us to assist," Ogden said, who also cautions that many political and financial hurdles have to be overcome.


Houston Chronicle Article
The Houston Chronicle reports that key state lawmakers are determined to devise a plan to prevent large numbers of layoffs at UTMB. The article quotes State Sen. Steve Ogden, R-Bryan, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, and state Rep. Warren Chisum, R-Pampa, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, as saying that they will try to find money to prevent layoffs at UTMB. "We recognize that this is a human and a financial catastrophe, and there is going to be a need for the state to pitch in. The issue is when and how much," Ogden said. And Chisum said, "Ogden and I are on the same track, and we don't want to release 4,000 employees." The Chronicle article also mentions that UTMB planned to open a pediatric urgent care center today and will begin delivering babies next week.


In the Austin American-Statesman, Dr. Kenneth Shine, interim chancellor of the UT System, says that there will be significant layoffs at UTMB. "We recognize there have to be significant reductions in force on the island. It's a very challenging situation." One reason reductions are necessary, he said, is that the 500-bed hospital at the campus is expected to resume operations as a 200-bed hospital and that the patient load already had declined following Hurricane Rita in 2005, and it's not clear what the island's population — and demand for health care — will be after Ike. read more here The article was distributed by The Associated Press and has been posted by news outlets all over the state, including KRIS -TV in Corpus Christi. read more here


UTMB campus struggles to recover
The Daily Texan, Sept. 29, 2008
Much of the work on the UTMB campus involves assisting the staff and students displaced by damage to the campus. Kathy Shingleton, vice president for human resources, said her department’s biggest challenge is finding temporary housing for many of the 8,000 employees who work on the island.


On hard-hit Galveston, researchers regroup
Science Magazine, Sept. 26, 2008
UTMB virologist Scott Weaver said that cleanup efforts at UTMB labs are proceeding more rapidly than expected. "The mood is very, very up," said Dr. David Gorenstein, associate dean of research.


UTMB slowly recovering after hard hit by Ike
KHOU (Channel 11), Sept. 26, 2008
This story details some of the storm damage at UTMB as well as the arrival of two mobile operating rooms. At this time, "anything more than first aid is transferred off island by helicopter," said Dr. Joan Richardson, UTMB emergency preparedness officer.


Legislators tour UTMB damage
Galveston County Daily News, Sept. 25, 2008
State Rep. Craig Eiland and Texas House Speaker Tom Craddick on Thursday got a look at the damage at UTMB. Michael Shriner, vice president for facilities and campus services, said the first floors of all medical branch buildings were inundated with floodwater, which was between 3 and 6 feet high in some places.


UTMB planning off-island operations
Galveston County Daily News, Sept. 23, 2008
UTMB is in full recovery mode, planning online and alternate class locations for students, off-island office operations for employees, off-island clinics and alternate hospital treatment centers. "At the end of each day, we’re going to be better and stronger," said Dr. Karen Sexton, executive vice president and chief executive officer of health systems.


UTMB planning off-island operations
Galveston County Daily News, Sept. 24, 2008
UTMB’s Dr. Karen Sexton is quoted in this article about the recovery efforts that include online and alternate class locations for students, off-island office operations for employees, off-island clinics and alternate hospital treatment centers. "We’ve hit a bump with the effects of this storm, but it’s not stopping us. We’re going to be back for our students, our staff, our patients. At the end of each day, we’re going to be better and stronger."


In Galveston, Texas, Hospital Weathers Storm
National Public Radio, All Things Considered, Sept. 16, 2008
In Galveston, University of Texas Medical Branch staff evacuated all patients before Hurricane Ike and stayed through the storm. They used lessons learned during Hurricane Rita. Now, they are preparing to receive new patients.


Medical Branch organizes return to normalcy
The Galveston Daily News, Sept. 17, 2008
Down a darkened hallway at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, administrators huddled around a conference table…


Damaged Medical School in Galveston Looks for Places for Its Students
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 17, 2008
As daylight broke Tuesday over the University of Texas Medical Branch here, a helicopter circled overhead and morning-shift workers began to stream in down below. This was no ordinary day, however. The helicopter was bringing workers from the Federal…


Texas Universities Weather Hurricane Ike
Biological Research Information Center, Sept. 15, 2008
First the good news: Universities and research institutions in Texas suffered far less damage than some had feared from Hurricane Ike. Now, the bad news: It could take weeks for the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) on the flooded island of Galveston and satellite Texas A&M campuses in the Galveston area to be fully up and running.


Alzheimer’s eyes
Medical Discovery News, Sept. 6, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, was about two new eye tests being developed that can detect Alzheimer’s disease. "They involve a low-intensity laser that briefly sends low-power light into the eye. It’s safe and not uncomfortable. In one test, a device detects any scattering of the light which would happen if small clumps of beta amyloid are present. In the second test a fluorescent dye is injected into the eye to bind to the proteins. When you shine an infrared light, they glow confirming Alzheimer’s disease." Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


Ebola cell-invasion strategy uncovered
Science Daily, Sept. 3, 2008
UTMB’s Robert Davey, senior author of a new study that could lead to a breakthrough in the fight against the ebola virus, is quoted in this article. "The nice part about identifying entry mechanisms is you can prevent the virus from infecting the cell," Davey said. "You can stop the whole show before it even gets started." Another version of the article appears in the Galveston County Daily News. And the study is posted in the Public Library of Science – Pathogens.


FBI admits missteps, but defends anthrax probe, scientific evidence
The China Post, Aug. 20, 2008
UTMB’s Dr. C.J. Peters is quoted in this article regarding the death of Dr. Bruce Ivins, a scientist whom the FBI said is solely responsible for the anthrax attacks in 2001. Some scientists, including Peters, are skeptical about the chain of evidence that led the FBI to link the strain of anthrax used in the attacks to Ivins. One of Peters’ comments, which originally was posted on CIDRAP News on Aug. 15, is in a Reuters article that is being distributed worldwide. "I want to see the data. I want to see the valid scientific links made."


Blast brain injury
Medical Discovery News, Aug. 16, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, was about blast brain injury that occurs when an explosion sends waves of pressure through a body. This type of injury, which occurs to many soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, is difficult to detect with imaging equipment because the injury often is at the molecular level. Blast brain injuries often are called "silent injuries" because brain cells associated with learning and memory can die months after an explosion occurred. Medical "[t]reatment for blast injury is still in its infancy. That’s why we need more research to understand it and design appropriate diagnostics and therapies to manage this ‘silent disease.’" Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


FBI conclusions in anthrax probe meet skepticism
CIDRAP News, Aug. 15, 2008
This Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy article quotes UTMB’s Dr. C. J. Peters about the strain of anthrax that the FBI says Dr. Bruce Ivins mailed in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. According to the FBI, Ivins killed himself just before he was to be indicted for the anthrax attacks. Peters, along with other researchers, question the methodology used by the FBI in matching the anthrax in the letters to a batch of anthrax in Ivins’s custody. From the article: Referring to the four mutations reported by the FBI, he{Peters} said, "They're talking about a substrain of the Ames strain. Well, where did that substrain arise? It arose during the preparation of the Ames strain. If Bruce Ivins propagated it and got this strain, and someone else propagated it, how do we know they didn't get the same substrain?" Peters said the FBI should publish its analysis in a scientific journal so that people who work in bacterial genomics can examine it. "I think it's something that can be done and must be done. If they don't do it, nobody's ever going to believe it," he said.


UAA newsletter update on UTMB biocontainment lab
Guidry News.com, Aug. 7, 2008
Alisha Prather, director of communications for the Galveston National Laboratory, says that construction of the laboratory at the University of Texas Medical Branch is approximately 98 percent complete. &quto;That means the facility is in the home stretch and we are proud to report that it remains on track and on budget," Prather said.


Parents can guard kids against West Nile
Galveston County Daily News, July 30, 2008
In their Keeping Kids Healthy column, UTMB Drs. Sally Robinson and Keith Bly suggest several ways to protect children from contracting the West Nile virus. Their suggestions include using a mosquito repellent containing DEET, keeping children indoors at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active and making sure that there is no standing water where the insects can breed.


IBM grant to help UTMB’s global computing project discover dengue drugs
Guidry News Service, July 28, 2008
IBM has awarded the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston a $22,000 grant to install a high-performance IBM storage system to assist its global computing effort to find drugs for reemerging infectious diseases like dengue, West Nile and hepatitis C.


Lippodissolve
Medical Discovery News, July 26, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, was about lippodissolve, a technique involving a series of injections to dissolve fatty tissue. Herzog and Niesel note that the procedure has not been fully researched nor sanctioned by the FDA and that the long-term effects of the treatment are unknown. They also note that &qout;the societies for plastic surgeons and dermatologists are wary and say it’s too early to call the procedure effective or in the long term – SAFE. The reported complications include bacterial infection, significant inflammation and localized tissue death – serious stuff.&qout; Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


Seasonal birth control
Medical Discovery News, July 19, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, was about birth control pills that reduce a woman’s periods from 13 to four a year. While the pills have advantages such as reduced cramping and have lower doses of estrogen and progestin, the professors also noted that, like other hormone-based birth control, these pills also increase the risk of stroke and blood clots and that scientists and doctors do not yet know the long-term ramifications of this birth control method. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


Return to Zambia features ASM Past-President Cliff Houston in Africa visiting sites of the Laboratory Capacity Building Program ASM oversees in partnership with CDC.


Victims of West Nile virus face long-term health problems
Nature Medicine, July 2008
This article in the current issue of Nature Medicine quotes UTMB’s Peter Mason, professor of pathology. There are currently no vaccines approved by the FDA against West Nile, but researchers recognize the threat of the virus. “Protecting the elderly is one important goal of vaccine development," said Mason. The article also mentions Mason’s rodent study published in the May issue of Vaccine hinting that a DNA vaccine might help protect against the West Nile virus. The DNA vaccine developed by Mason uses a genetically modified virus that can only survive long enough to infect a single cell, and thus cannot cause disease.


Bisphenol-A or BPA
Medical Discovery News, July 12, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on a chemical called Bisphenol-A or BPA. Studies show BPA can "leach" from plastics especially "hard plastics" like polycarbonate. You find it in everything from baby and bike water bottles. While high doses of BPA given to animals may have no lasting effects, human exposure to low doses may. So what can you do to avoid BPA? First, limit exposure to BPA containing plastics if you’re pregnant or have young children. Also avoid canned goods with plastic liners. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


West Nile may be here to stay
Brownsville Herald, July 9, 2008
In this article about the West Nile virus, UTMB’s Stephen Higgs, a faculty member at the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, is quoted about the difficulty in preventing the transmission of the disease.


Salmonella
Medical Discovery News, July 5, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on the recent outbreak of Salmonella and the detective work by the Centers for Disease Control to determine the source of the outbreak. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 78 radio stations.


Medical Discovery News
Lyme disease, June 28, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on Lyme disease, explaining how ticks spread the disease. They also provide tips on how to avoid contracting the disease, including removing woodpiles and leaf debris around the house, clearing thick brush and trees that attract deer and rodents, wearing long sleeves and pants, and using insect repellants. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program also airs on numerous radio stations across the country and in Mexico.


Personalized medicine
Medical Discovery News, June 21, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on personalized medicine. They explained how it's a treatment tailored to your exact illness and even your genetic makeup. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is broadcast by 47 stations in the United States and one in Mexico.


New West Nile and Japanese encephalitis vaccines produced
Medical Journal Houston, June 2008
UTMB researchers have developed new vaccines to protect against West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. The scientists showed that the vaccines protected laboratory mice and hamsters against the viruses, which can cause fatal brain inflammation in humans. Pathology professor Peter Mason is quoted.
(Link unavailable.)


Shingles vaccine
Medical Discovery News, June 14, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on people over 60 who had chicken pox years earlier. They note that the virus that caused the disease remains hidden in certain nerve cells. As people age their immune systems weaken, opening the door for the virus that caused chicken pox to cause shingles, a painful condition that can last for months. They recommend getting a dose of the shingles vaccine to prevent the condition. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Glioblastoma gene therapy
Medical Discovery News, June 7, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on glioblastoma, an incurable brain tumor. “Today there’s new research that’s giving patients hope. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in LA has developed a gene therapy that’s cured rats with glioblastomas,” they said. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Safety in the sun
Galveston County Daily News, June 9, 2008
UTMB Drs. Richard Wagner, Erica Kelly and Brian Zachariah know the value of sunscreen and offer advice on why it’s important to use it routinely and offer strategies on how to get family members to use it as well. In a sidebar, Dr. Bernard Godley emphasizes the importance of wearing sunglasses outdoors.


Boston University angers neighbors with Ebola, SARS germ lab
Bloomberg, June 5, 2008
Neighbors of a biosafety lab under construction in Boston vow to oppose opening of the facility in Boston. The article notes that UTMB plans to open its Galveston National Laboratory this year.


UTMB team develops new West Nile vaccine
Galveston County Daily News, June 3, 2008
UTMB researchers have developed new vaccines to protect against West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. The investigators, led by pathology professor Peter Mason, created the vaccines using an innovative technique that they believe could also enable the development of new vaccines against other diseases, such as yellow fever and dengue fever, which are caused by similar viruses.


Sunscreen rules
Medical Discovery News, May 31, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on sunscreens and their effect on UV-B and UV-A rays. They note that it has taken 20 years, but starting in 2009 manufacturers will start labeling their products based on the efficacy of their products at protecting against harmful exposure to the sun. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


New West Nile and Japanese encephalitis vaccines produced
Medical News Today, June 2, 2008
UTMB researchers have developed new vaccines to protect against West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. The investigators created the vaccines using an innovative technique that they believe could also enable the development of new vaccines against other diseases, such as yellow fever and dengue fever, which are caused by similar viruses. Peter Mason of the UTMB departments of pathology and microbiology and immunology, and colleagues reported their findings in back-to-back papers published in the current issue of the journal Vaccine.


The French paradox
Medical Discovery News, May 24, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, discuss the French: “They smoke, eat relatively high levels of saturated fat, and yet coronary heart disease is low in France!” Polyphenols, found in red wine, may have something to do with this apparent paradox but the professors continue to recommend a balanced diet and exercise as the best route to a healthy body.


Health officials warn of bacteria in bayou
Galveston County Daily News, May 27, 2008
Alfredo Torres, a microbiology professor at UTMB, is quoted in this article about the presence of elevated concentrations of bacteria in Dickinson Bayou.


The pill camera
Medical Discovery News, May 17, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on a tiny wireless camera designed to help doctors detect esophageal cancer before ominous symptoms develop. They note that this year 16,000 people will be diagnosed in the United States with esophageal cancer and 14,000 will die from it. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Flavivirus DNA vaccine with a kick
Nature Biotechnology, May 2008
Alan D.T. Barrett, director of UTMB’s Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, wrote this commentary on a previously published article appearing in the same journal titled “Single-round infectious particles enhance immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine against West Nile virus,” by David C Chang, of the University of Queensland (Australia).


CDC biolab not ready after 2 1/2 years
Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 15, 2008
ATLANTA – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new maximum-security laboratories in Atlanta were supposed to open in the fall of 2005. But the suite of Biosafety Level 4 labs still haven't been certified as ready to operate. Michael Holbrook, director of UTMB’s Robert E. Shope M.D. Laboratory, said that UTMB took less than seven months for its BSL-4 lab in the Shope lab to become operational after construction was finished on the building in late 2003.


Breast cancer and light
Medical Discovery News, May 10, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on breast cancer and light. Noting that breast cancer rates in industrialized countries is six times that of developing countries, researchers have turned their attention to the effect that artificial light has on melatonin levels. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Allergies
Medical Discovery News, May 3, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on allergies. Some 40 million Americans suffer from indoor allergies Asthma, a related illness, is the No. 1 childhood chronic disease, affecting 9 million children in the United States. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Sleep apnea
Medical Discovery News, April 26, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on sleep apnea. Nearly 12 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep apnea, many without realizing it. Undiagnosed, it can lead to high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, memory and weight problems, impotency and headaches. The condition Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Chlamydia
Medical Discovery News, April 19, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on chlamydia. Chlamydia is known as a "silent" disease because 75 percent of infected women and half of infected men have no symptoms. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


NK but not CD1-restricted NKT cells facilitate systemic inflammation during polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis
The Journal of Immunology, May 1, 2008
The journal features research conducted by UTMB’s Anthony Etogo, Jesus Nunez, Cheng Lin, Tracy Toliver-Kinsky and Edward Sherwood. Evidence suggests that NK and NKT cells contribute to inflammation and mortality during septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). However, the specific contributions of these cell types to the pathogenesis of CLP-induced septic shock have not been fully defined. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which NK and NKT cells mediate the host response to CLP. Control, NK cell-deficient, and NKT cell-deficient mice underwent CLP. This study provided new insights into the mechanisms used by NK cells to facilitate acute inflammation during septic shock.


New kind of killer virus discovered in Bolivia
New Scientist, April 18, 2008
A team of disease hunters has announced the discovery of a deadly new virus, found in a remote village in South America. Experts say the virus – named Chapare – is probably limited to a small swathe of Bolivia, but urbanization and climate change could expand its range. Professor Charles Fulhorst, of the departments of pathology and microbiology and immunology at UTMB, says Chapare is the tip of the iceberg. Many new species of virus lurk in South America – and perhaps North America. "Just when you think you know what’s out there, another one pops out," he says.


Fluoridation
Medical Discovery News, April 12, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on fluoridation. Despite the success of fluoride at reducing tooth decay, only 60 percent of Americans drink fluoridated water. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Emerging pathogens: Challenges and successes of molecular diagnostics
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, April 10, 2008
This review presents representative emerging viral respiratory infections, hemorrhagic fevers and hepatitides, as well as bacterial and parasitic zoonotic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary infections. Agent characteristics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and diagnostic methods are tabulated for another 22 emerging viruses and five emerging bacteria. Authors are Jianli Dong, Juan P. Olano, Jere W. McBride and David H. Walker, of the UTMB Departments of Pathology, and Microbiology and Immunology.


Group hopes to raise $10,000 for pediatric AIDS relief program
Daily Texan, April 8, 2008
AUSTIN – Members of pre-medical honor society Alpha Phi Sigma at UT-Austin completed their Global Health Awareness Week rally with a cook-off. Immunology professor Miles W. Cloyd of UTMB will address the problem of infectious disease throughout the world and propose possible solutions tonight at the honor society’s second event of the awareness week.


Second hand smoke
Medical Discovery News, April 5, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on second hand smoke. Among the findings on second hand smoke noted in this segment is “an astounding 50 to 75 percent of children in the United States have detectable levels of nicotine or its breakdown products in their blood.” Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Biolab follies
The Phoenix (Boston), April 2, 2008
BOSTON – The article mentions UTMB but is about the controversy surrounding construction of the biocontainment laboratory by Boston University.


Irritable bowel syndrome
Medical Discovery News, March 29, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on irritable bowel diseases. Scientists do not know the cause of IBD but they believe the immune system is turned on but doesn’t shut off. There’s hope genetic work will lead to effective treatment. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. on KUHF-FM in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Groundbreaking hybrid biology course now in full swing
North Channel Sentinel, March 27, 2008
San Jacinto College is keeping pace with the times by offering two new “hybrid” biology courses, as well as 10 related “virtual” labs. UTMB is among the institutions collaborating with SJC on the project.


Duchenne muscular dystrophy
KUHF-FM, March 22, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on Duchenne muscular dystrophy. According to this report, a new drug that corrects a genetic defect offers hope to patients. Medical Discovery News airs at 10 a.m. in Houston. The program is aired by 48 radio stations.


Medical Discovery News
KUHF-FM, March 15, 2008
UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel devoted Saturday’s installment to the Black Death and what is known about the pathogen that caused it and how that has changed over time.


Vigilance is key to avoiding recreational water illnesses
Guidry News, March 13, 2008
Recreational water illnesses, such as shigella, salmonella, vibrio, hepatitis A and cryptosporidium, can quickly spoil a vacation. Dr. Janak A. Patel, director of pediatric infectious diseases and immunology at UTMB, offers advice on how to avoid a bad day at the beach or water park.


Microscopic ‘astronauts’ to go back in orbit
Science Daily, March 10, 2008
Among the experiments carried by the space shuttle Endeavor when it launched this morning were two by UTMB researchers David Niesel and Michael McGinnis. The experiments are designed to determine the effect of spaceflight on the gene expression and virulence potential of model microorganisms. Neisel’s experiment uses streptococcus pneumoniae and McGinnis’ experiment uses saccharomyces cerevisiae.


Gout
KUHF-FM, March 8, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on gout. “If you’re unfamiliar with gout, that’s because until recently it’s been a disease of the European aristocracy of centuries past. The causes are everything from obesity, longer life span to the widespread use of diuretics and aspirin,” they reported.


CU-Boulder alumnus, two payloads heading for space station
University of Colorado News, March 7, 2008
BOULDER, Colo. – NASA's space shuttle Endeavour will be carrying four microgravity experiments, which were designed by researchers at UTMB and at Montana State University and Arizona State University when it blasts off from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on Tuesday, March 11.


Obesity genes
KUHF-FM, March 1, 2008
Saturday’s edition of Medical Discovery News, by UTMB Professors Norbert Herzog and David Niesel, focused on obesity in children. “It’s undeniable the problem is self induced but there’s evidence a percentage of these cases may have a genetic origin. Biomedical scientists have identified hundreds of genes affecting caloric intake, appetite and weight,” they reported.


Research from University of Texas provides new data about HIV/AIDS
Calibre MacroWorld, Feb. 28, 2008
This study, published in AIDS Care, focused on psychiatric disorders and their association with risk behaviors for HIV and hepatitis in prison populations. The authors concluded, “It will be important for future investigations to examine the extent to which psychiatric disorders serve as a barrier to medical care, communication with clinicians and adherence to prescribed medical regimens among both HIV-mono-infected and HIV/hepatitis-co-infected inmates.” Principal author is Jacques Baillargeon of the department of preventive medicine and community health at UTMB.


Bioweapons watchdog group hangs it up
Austin American-Statesman, Feb. 27, 2008
AUSTIN, Texas – The Sunshine Project, a nonprofit group that blew the whistle on safety and security lapses involving research on biological warfare materials at Texas A&M University, is suspending operations indefinitely. UTMB is mentioned as one of the institutions followed by the project.


Biodefense watchdog project folds, leaving a void
Science Magazine, Feb. 15, 2008
An activist who has been both loathed and lauded for his criticism of safety at biodefense labs is closing his doors. Edward Hammond, director of the Austin-based Sunshine Project, earlier this month posted a note on his Web site saying he is suspending operations. The article quotes Dr. C.J. Peters, director of UTMB’s Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases.


Keeping cool in the hot zone
Occupational Health and Safety, February 2008
This article focuses on how health and safety are priorities at UTMB’s Robert E. Shope, M.D., Laboratory. Mike Holbrook, lab director, is quoted. The Shope lab is the only full-sized Biosafety Level-4 lab on a university campus in the United States.


Barrett to oversee vaccine center
Galveston County Daily News, Feb. 1, 2008
Dr. Alan Barrett has been named director of the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development. Barrett, who holds the John S. Dunn Distinguished Chair in Biodefense, will begin serving in the new position immediately.


Door failure forces disease lab shutdown
Galveston County Daily News, Jan. 26, 2008
A laboratory used by researchers to study highly infectious organisms is being shut down at UTMB after an internal door failed twice. No one in the containment areas when the door malfunctioned and there was no threat of pathogens escaping.


Glitch prompts shutdown of biohazard lab at UTMB
Houston Chronicle, Jan. 26, 2008
Officials have temporarily shut down the biological hazard lab at UTMB after the failure of an internal door during experiments with avian flu and hemorrhagic fever, a UTMB spokeswoman said Friday. There was no risk of exposure resulting from the failure Wednesday of the internal door to the room where the experiments were being conducted.


Bioresearch Online’s top 10 of 2007
Bioresearch Online, Jan. 7, 2008
An article titled "Protein Found that Slows Hepatitis C Growth in Liver Cells" appearing in Bioresearch Online last April was among the Web site’s top 10 news stories of 2007. Dr. Stanley M. Lemon, director of the NIH-funded Hepatitis C Research Center at UTMB and of UTMB’s Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, was senior author of the paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.


West Nile susceptibility
Journal of the American Medical Association, Jan. 2, 2008
Seemingly harmless bites from mosquitoes not infected by the West Nile virus may make the disease worse in people who acquire the virus later from West Nile–infected insects, according to new research conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.